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[Solved] Physical connection between sensor-ADC-RaspberryPi


(@ranjanpal)
Active Member
Joined: 4 months ago
Posts: 16
Topic starter  

Hi,

I want to connect a current sensor (which is an analog sensor) to RaspberryPi via an ADC.

On the current sensor there are 4 ports as shown in attached figure.

 

 

+5V on sensor --- connected to ---- +5V on RPi

gnd on sensor --- connected to ---- gnd on RPi

My query is, what do these "out" and "o/c" pins mean?

Also,out of "out" and "o/c", which will get connected to my ADC input pin?

If somebody could please let me know these, I would be very much appreciative.

This topic was modified 4 months ago by ranjanpal

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 Hans
(@hans)
Noble Member Admin
Joined: 8 years ago
Posts: 1832
 

With the help of Google I found this:

+5v : 5v Supply
gnd : Supply Ground
out : Output Voltage proportional to current, 11mV/A for 5V supply
o/c : Over-Current Detection Digital Output, Low on Over-Current, High otherwise

Current=(Vout-2.5)/0.011

Note: Over Current can be detected by adjusting the preset for desired value of current [the blue potentiometer!].
Turn preset clockwise to increase current range and anti-clockwise to decrease current range.

On over current, o/c pin goes low and red LED glows. 

I also found this Arduino topic, this example at RoboJax, and this YouTube video.

 

 

So my best guess:

OUT goes to the analog pin (ADC). In the Arduino Topic they are discussing the math as well:

float scalefactor = 0.011;
float current = ((5.0/1024.)*AnalogRead(A0)-2.5)/scalefactor;

(scalefactor derived from spec sheet: 11mV/A with a 5V power supply)

O/C goes to a digital pin to detect over-current (normal = HIGH. over-current = LOW).
I'm pretty sure that it is not required to use this pin, unless you'd like to detect over-current of course.

 

Hope this helps ... 😊 


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(@ranjanpal)
Active Member
Joined: 4 months ago
Posts: 16
Topic starter  

Hi Hans,

Thank you so much for your valuable feedback.

This was really helpful to me.


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 Hans
(@hans)
Noble Member Admin
Joined: 8 years ago
Posts: 1832
 

Awesome! Glad I could help 😊 


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