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Connect SCT013 with...
 
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Connect SCT013 with ADS1115/RaspberryPi


(@ranjanpal)
Active Member
Joined: 5 months ago
Posts: 16
Topic starter  

Hi,

A current transformer SCT013 (  https://www.seeedstudio.com/Non-invasive-AC-Current-Sensor-20A-ma-p-2054.html ) has a 3.5 mm jack at the end.

How do I physically connect this jack to an ADC like ADS1115 which has male header pins to receive analog signals?

I have seen some documentation wherein people have cut the cable of SCT013, soldered it to a male header pin; and then connected it to ADS1115 with F-F jumper cables.

However, is there any way out to interface this SCT without cutting the cable?

If you could please let me know how do we go about this, I would be very much thankful.

This topic was modified 4 months ago 4 times by ranjanpal

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 Hans
(@hans)
Noble Member Admin
Joined: 8 years ago
Posts: 1845
 

Ehm, I'd consider either cutting the cable, or ordering a male connector (3.5mm stereo / Sony male jack - matching the female connector) and wire that to the ADC so you can easily remove or replace the SCT013.
This seem quite trivial, so maybe I did not understand your question?


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(@ranjanpal)
Active Member
Joined: 5 months ago
Posts: 16
Topic starter  

@hans

Thanks a lot for your suggestions.

I referred to following youtube video (

at 7:10 video timer.)

Instead of soldering the wire to male header pins, can I directly connect the red and white wires of the SCT (that has been cut) to  GPIO pins of micro-controller using F-F jumper wires?


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 Hans
(@hans)
Noble Member Admin
Joined: 8 years ago
Posts: 1845
 

It seems you may not want to connect the SCT directory to the Arduino.
A quick look makes me think he actually uses some sorts of voltage divider before connecting it to the Arduino.
I would assume he does this for a very good reason 😉 


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(@ranjanpal)
Active Member
Joined: 5 months ago
Posts: 16
Topic starter  

In the video, the resistance converts the output current to voltage. since sct-013-000 gives current output only.( https://www.mcielectronics.cl/website_MCI/static/documents/Datasheet_SCT013.pdf )

However. SCT-013-020 gives voltage output and no burden resistance is required.

In that case, can we not directly connect bare ends of the cut wire of SCT-013-020 directly to our microcontroller?

I checked out this link which makes use of a female jack ( http://lechacal.com/wiki/index.php/Current_Transformer_Conditioner ) and hence does not cut the wire of SCT.

But mo such Current_Transformer_Conditioner  is available online.

This post was modified 4 months ago by ranjanpal

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 Hans
(@hans)
Noble Member Admin
Joined: 8 years ago
Posts: 1845
 

Hmm, that is interesting (and well hidden haha).
From what the spec sheet tells us, I think you're right.
0-1V should be just fine for the Analog pin on an Arduino.

Keep in mind though:
I do not have the equipment here to test and you may blow up your Arduino worse case scenario (even though be very unlikely).
Personally: I'd just connect it directly, relying on the specs (0-1V output) and being very aware that any experiments I do with my Arduino could damage it.
I also have to say that with all the silly things I have done with my Arduino, I can only say that they are quite resilient.


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