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Huge output files

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 Anonymous
Joined: 53 years ago
Posts: 0
Topic starter  

Yeah, I know how to use a terminal, thanks ;)

(I'm a coder and a computer tech)

The new commands ran fine. I'll try to replace the files manually in ApplePiBaker.app. I don't know if that'll break the signing or whatever, but hey - it's worth a try. I'll let you know how it goes.


   
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 Hans
(@hans)
Famed Member Admin
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 2282
 

Awesome - yeah I wasn't sure. I get all kinds of users here 😁 

I would expect it to fail ... (signing and all)
If not: Awesome!

Either way; I'll add this version to APB distribution as well.
Seems I forgot to set the proper target SDK then.


   
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 Hans
(@hans)
Famed Member Admin
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 2282
 

I just uploaded a modified 2.3.0 zipped version, maybe you'd want to test that one.
It's signed ... 😊 


   
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 Anonymous
Joined: 53 years ago
Posts: 0
Topic starter  

Oh that worked SO much better! Took like half an hour to image the drive, and produced a 1.5GB 7zip. Awesome!

Copying the files manually worked fine. Looks like El Crapitan isn't so militant about signing. I'll download your modified version anyway though for future use.

Thanks for taking the time to troubleshoot this.

Incidentally, maybe your program should check for the little utilities failing and throw up an error, rather than just taking forever and producing insanely large files? 😏 

 


   
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 Hans
(@hans)
Famed Member Admin
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 2282
 

You're most welcome and ... Awesome that it works now!
Seems El Crapitan isn't as Crap after all 😉 

Would you mind testing the version I just uploaded?
Just to make sure before I update the "official" version as well 😁 

Well, to be honest, I never expected this problem, and for some reason the code didn't catch that something went wrong.
I've added it to my ToDo list though ...


   
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 Anonymous
Joined: 53 years ago
Posts: 0
Topic starter  

Oh, El Crapitan is definitely still crap. It has many issues: including, but not limited to, trackpad bugs, audio bugs, bluetooth issues and display freezes.

If I knew for sure that the newer OS would fix these issues, I'd prioritise updating sooner.

Anyhow....your new version worked. I did notice the GUI kinda lagged for a bit while resizing, and the process took about 50 minutes; but maybe that happened last time as well and I just didn't notice? I wasn't sat here staring at it all the way through, so...

Again, thanks for fixing this. There's a massive shortage of software to snapshot Raspberry drives. Balena Etcher is great for writing them, but doesn't support reading. HDDRawCopy is great but only supports Windows partitions. So having a similar program that understands ext2/3/4 is awesome.

Incidentally...does ApplePIBaker shrink FAT32 partitions, or just ext? Does it understand NTFS at all? In short, should I only use it with Linux drives?


   
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 Hans
(@hans)
Famed Member Admin
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 2282
 

Yeah, well, I have seen so much crap when moving to the next macOS version (from a devs perspective) that I don't blame you for sticking with El Capitan 😉 

APB only shrinks Linux partitions. To do that I had to get familiar with how partitions work and such - so it was quite an undertaking.
With Raspberry Pi in mind, the FAT partition is typically just used to boot and the EXT partition for the OS + data.
I've debated a few times already to start from scratch with a v3 that handles partitions and resizing and such - and even have a Windows and Linux version.
But it will take a ton of time to do this, and at times I do have mixed feelings if I should continue or not.

All this started with me building a little GUI for "dd" late 2013, and 700,000 downloads later - here we are ... 😊 


   
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 Anonymous
Joined: 53 years ago
Posts: 0
Topic starter  

Sounds very complicated. I guess it depends if you're confident in your ability; and if sufficient information is available. It would need to support the new Mac filesystem. (Also, I don't know if you're aware, but there's a weird thing with Win8/10's NTFS that Linux can't properly handle. Folders created in Linux are often permanently read-only in Windows 8/10. Dunno why.)

But if you're pretty sure you can do it, I'd say give it a shot. People would probably pay for that.

You need a more intuitive interface though. More like Etcher or HDDRawCopy.


   
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 Hans
(@hans)
Famed Member Admin
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 2282
 

Yeah it definitely isn't easy. I do recall NTFS being a problem child indeed. I think when I tried to use FUSE to mount NTFS volumes.
The only well working option has been NTFS for Mac by Paragon (their extFS is pretty good as well).

Funny that you mention the interface: it was inspired by Balena Etcher haha.
Suggestions are welcome though!

If I'd go that route then for now I'd only support FAT and EXT partitions, with support for Extended Partitions (although it's a mystery to me why anyone would use those for a Raspberry Pi), and maybe a Windows and Linux version as well. Maybe one of these days ...


   
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 Anonymous
Joined: 53 years ago
Posts: 0
Topic starter  

I use Paragon, on all platforms. I've found it to work reasonably well. However, I'm fairly sure it suffers from the NTFS folder bug on Linux. Couldn't swear to it though. It's been a while since I've used Linux to restore a bunch of Windows folders to a Windows drive.

I think that if you're not going to support NTFS and the Apple filesystems, might as well just stick to what you have now. Nobody uses FAT these days for a boot/root volume, other than tiny Linux boot partitions that don't need shrinking. It's the NTFS, exFAT and Apple stuff that people are missing.

Interface suggestions:

  • The buttons (e.g. select a disk) don't look like buttons. Etcher's buttons are obvious.
  • Selecting a disk should open a dialog with detailed information - brand, size, partition list, connection type etc.
  • The buttons at the bottom are obscure (except for the help and about buttons). They should at the very least have labels. And they should probably be checkboxes.
  • Shrink should be enabled by default. Expand maybe not. Perhaps split the option into two, and put the buttons/checkboxes inside the backup and restore panels.
  • The advanced disk panel still lists absolutely nothing on my system.

Aside from the above, I think the interface is decent. I can see now the similarity with Etcher.


   
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