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Name My TV Series v1.4.2 available …

Name My TV Series v1.4.2 available …
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Available as of today, version 1.4.2 of Name My TV Series, for Windows, MacOS X and Linux (32bit and 64bit).

This version addresses the renaming of subtitles in different languages (for example: episode.en.srt and episode.nl.srt).
With this version a 64 bit Linux version has been made available as well.

QNAP – Tweaking and using pyLoad for Put.io downloads …

QNAP – Tweaking and using pyLoad for Put.io downloads …
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If you’re familiar with the Put.io service (article) then using pyLoad as your download manager is your best choice (at this moment) when running it on a QNAP.

Put.io is a service that downloads torrents for you to their cloud service, where you have your own private space so you can download it from there like any other file. Put.io even supports the use download managers that split downloads into multiple chunks so that you can maximize your Internet bandwidth (they even recommend it).

Other download managers on the QNAP however do not support multiple chunks, so you’re “stuck” with pyLoad and that’s where you might run into small issues, but we will get to that into this article.

Put.io – Download torrent safely with a cloud service …

Put.io – Download torrent safely with a cloud service …
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Downloading a torrent safely can be tricky. All kinds of options and services out there offer you privacy protection and most of them (VPN’s for example) can be cumbersome to setup or maintain, and are often slower than the real deal.

Put.io however offers a cloud service that does all this for you. It downloads (and even seeds) a torrent safely for you into their cloud service and stores the downloaded files in your private storage space (starts at 50Gb!!).

Once a download has been completed, you can then download the downloaded torrent as a regular file. They recommend and support the use of a Download Manager to get the maximum speed out of your Internet connection.

For $0.99 you can take it for a spin for a day and you’ll be surprised how well it works.

Boblight Config Maker – Update 1.4 available

Boblight Config Maker – Update 1.4 available
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Today I released version 1.4 of Boblight Config Maker for Linux, Windows and MacOS X.

This version allows you to resize the window (for those with smaller screens).
I have also included the option to have a Magic Word calculation done automatically (commonly used with Adafruit and such).

The latest version can be found in the Boblight Config Maker article, or on the Downloads Page.

MacOS X – Give your Mac Multiple Desktops with Spaces

MacOS X – Give your Mac Multiple Desktops with Spaces
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I didn’t realize how few users really know about “Spaces”, a MacOS X built-in desktop management feature, until a friend was looking over my shoulder and was surprised how fast I switched between desktops.

Spaces, even in Mavericks, allows you to have multiple desktops. With my Logitech Performance MX mouse, switching between these desktops is super easy and super fast. Other mice with extra buttons can do this as well, and in this article I’ll show you how. This option, virtual desktop, is of course nothing new, specially for Linux users. But it is still amazing to see how few people actually use it.

Give it a try, especially when you’re a multi-monitor fan, you’ll LOVE this feature to keep your work environment clutter free.

NetGear R7000 – How to install DD-WRT …

NetGear R7000 – How to install DD-WRT …
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I recently purchased a NetGear R7000 Nighthawk WiFi router capable of 2.4Ghz and 5Ghz Wifi. This router so far has been awesome – compared to my old ActionTec WiFi router: it right away gave met a 10% speed increase on my downloads and it supports 5Ghz WiFi (great for Apple products).

Now I wanted to try something different: DD-WRT.
DD-WRT is an open source firmware available for numerous routers, offering a vast amount of features that you will not find on normal routers. For me the main reason to try this was: Support for DNSMasq, so I can assign multiple hostnames to the same IP address for my Test Webserver, and build-in VPN. Not just VPN support as most routers claim (meaning: pass through of VPN traffic)! No, we’re talking real OpenVPN build in so the router actually maintains the VPN connection.

In this guide I will use Kong’s DD-WRT firmware and go through the steps and go back to stock if needed.

Boblight Config Maker – Update 1.3 available

Boblight Config Maker – Update 1.3 available
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Today I released version 1.3 of Boblight Config Maker for Linux, Windows and MacOS X.

This version allows you to choose the desired decimal separator (period or comma), as some users have ran into issues with this.
I recommend to always start testing with a period, and if that doesn’t work resort to testing with a comma.

The latest version can be found in the Boblight Config Maker article, or on the Downloads Page.

Arduino Ethernet – Pushing data to a (PHP) server

Arduino Ethernet – Pushing data to a (PHP) server
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In a previous article, I demonstrated how to use “Data Pull” to read sensor data over a computer network using an Arduino ENC28J60 Ethernet shield/module and some sensors (DS18B20 for example). In this article we will do the opposite: Data Push.

This means that we will make the Arduino send data to our server, which stored the results in a database. For this we will use an Apache, MySQL and PHP setup, which can be a full-size web-server or an easy to install “WAMPServer” setup on your desktop or laptop computer.

Some basic experience with PHP and web-servers will be helpful when working your way through this article.

Arduino Ethernet – Pulling data from your Arduino

Arduino Ethernet – Pulling data from your Arduino
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Playing with the Arduino is definitely fun, specially when you start looking into fun little add-ons like the Arduino ENC28J60 Ethernet shield/module we will looked.

Now sending a “Hello World!” message might be cool, but it’s hardly functional and since the Arduino is great with all kinds of sensors (like the DS18B20 temperature sensor), why not combine the two to retrieve Arduino Data over a network connection? With that comes the question … how the heck do I get my data? Obviously the “see it my web-browser” is one option, but how about a server application that is to store the sensor data?

In this article we will look at a trick we can use to “Pull” data to our server, server-application or even web-browser. This is probably the easiest way to get your data.

Web-Enable your Arduino with an Arduino ENC28J60 Ethernet shield …

Web-Enable your Arduino with an Arduino ENC28J60 Ethernet shield …
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One day I ran into this particular Arduino ENC28J60 Ethernet module on eBay for $18. It included an Arduino ENC28J60 Ethernet shield/module and an Arduino USB Nano V3.0. Well, that’s pretty much for free isn’t it? So I could not resist and bought it, fully well knowing that it might not work. It took a little bit of figuring out, but I finally got it to work.

Playing with the Arduino is definitely fun, specially when you start looking into these kind of fun gadgets (snoop around on eBay and Amazon to see what’s out there!). If you look at eBay, or for example Amazon, for an Arduino ENC28J60 Ethernet shield, then you’ll notice that there are plenty models variations. 

In this article we will focus on selecting a good ethernet library for the ENC28J60 and run a “Hello World” example.
The code discussed in this article will probably work for all of them. 

How to measure temperature with your Arduino and a DS18B20

How to measure temperature with your Arduino and a DS18B20
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In this example project we will be combining an Arduino and a DS18B20 temperature sensor.

The DS18B20 is a so called 1-wire digital temperature sensor. The words “digital” and “1-wire” make this sensor really cool and allows you, with a super simple setup, to read the temperature of one or more sensors. You can even connect multiple devices together, utilizing only one pin on your Arduino.

The more I play with the Arduino, the more fun it gets 

Resistor Color Calculator

Resistor Color Calculator
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This Resistor Color Calculator allows you to enter resistor color codes to determine their Ohm-age (value), but it also works the other way around allowing you to enter the desired Ohm-age to find out what the needed color codes for the resistor should be.

I’ve had this one on all my old websites since way back in the day … but I do find myself going there often when I’m playing with electronic projects.
At some point I figured, it could use an update and it should probably get a home at Tweaking4All as well.

The updated version can now also calculate with 5 band resistors.

AmbiLight with XBMC Boblight, OpenElec and WS2811/WS2812 LEDs

AmbiLight with XBMC Boblight, OpenElec and WS2811/WS2812 LEDs
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Back in the day, when the first LED TV’s appeared, Philips came with a great feature called AmbiLight.

AmbiLight consisted out of lights (LEDs) that would project to the wall behind your TV, one or more colors matching the content on your TV. So if the majority of the screen would be red, then the light emitted would be red, if the majority of the screen is green, then green light would be emitted, etc.

Over the years this has been refined to multiple colors, matching small parts of the screen. Unfortunately though, AmbiLight is not something you can simply add to your TV. You will have to buy an Philips AmbiLight TV, …

Until now though. Some smart guy(s) created Boblight, which is opensource and can run (for example) on your XBMC computer. The computer analyzes the video content and “converts” it to signals for LED strands, so you can attach these strands behind your TV and have a DYI AmbiLight effect.

Note : This will only work for content played through your XBMC Media player (I used OpenElec)! So your regular TV shows, your XBox or PlayStation, none of these will have an influence on the “AmbiLight” we will be discussing in this article.

How to Install WiFi in your Mac Pro (for models 2008 to 2012)

How to Install WiFi in your Mac Pro (for models 2008 to 2012)
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I just installed a WiFi card in a Mac Pro and thought I’d share the ease of installation on my website. In my case, I installed it in my pride and joy, a 8-core Mac Pro 2008 model (Mac Pro 3,1) which kicks ass, but it works on newer models as well. As long as it’s a a model before the new late 2013 model (the fancy trash bin).

For this WiFi upgrade I used the Apple MB363Z/A Airport Extreme Wireless Upgrade Kit, found at Amazon new for $25, which MacOS X recognizes instantly – so no need for crazy drivers and weird WiFi apps. The Mac Pro, made out a metal alloy, has two build in WiFi antenna’s and this setup will pick up on 2.4Ghz and 5Ghz WiFi (if the same card is being used).

Boblight Config Maker for Windows, MacOS X and Linux

Boblight Config Maker for Windows, MacOS X and Linux
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When I started building my own “AmbiLight” project, based on OpenElec (XBMC) and Boblight, the first problem I ran into is finding a tool to create a Boblight config files for use under MacOS X. Naturally, there are quite a few great tools out there that do a good job, but it’s either a script, web-based or limited to Windows users (Boblight Config Tool), and again … not for MacOS X …

Creating a config file for Boblight can be quite tedious when you have a large amount of LEDs (I had 290 LEDs), when you mix up the orientation of your LEDs (pretty common issue), or when you do not have your LEDs spread out evenly.

So here is my tool, for Windows, MacOS X and Linux, written in Lazarus Pascal - enjoy!
UPDATE: Another minor bug fixed, added test video and Boblight Config Maker can now also be found at Alternativeto.net.

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