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Lazarus – How to add data to lists with AddObject

Lazarus – How to add data to lists with AddObject
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Some components in Lazarus Pascal (and Delphi), especially the ones that have a list of strings, allow you to add additional data by linking an object to a string. The function “AddObject” is often used for this, but it’s also the most overlooked option.

With this option you can link (add) any kind of data to rows in your string list, allowing you to add additional (non visual) data.

In this short article, I’ll show you how you can work with these objects, which allow you to extend the data stored with your lists.

Name My TV Series v1.6 available …

Name My TV Series v1.6 available …
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As of today, version 1.6 of Name My TV Series has become available for Windows, MacOSX and Linux (32- and 64-bit).

This release fixes a bug with the “%S1” parameter, and adds an AirDate field (%AD) which can be used in filenames. Additionally, the file created/modified date can be set to the first air date as well.

Further more, “EPGuide” has been removed as a source, since TheTVDB usually provides better information, and “EPGuide” has proven to be unreliable when it comes to parsing data.

Feel free leave a comment at the Rename your TV Series Files article, where you can also download the latest version.

MacOS X – How to take Screenshots and add Annotations

MacOS X – How to take Screenshots and add Annotations
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I’ve been asked several times in the past, on how to take screenshot and annotate them afterwards, or how to do a so called “print-screen” to a printer for a hardcopy.

Some users, use screenshots for illustrating manuals, or articles for their website. Some use it to print error messages or odd things happening on their screen. And as with regular paper, some of us would like to annotate the images – add notes, comments, arrows, numbers or circle the important part of the image.

Annotating images is relatively easy, once you know where to find the tools to do this.

So in this article, for Mac OS X users: How to take screenshots, how to add annotations, and some additional related tips and tricks.

ConnectMeNow – Version 1.6 available …

ConnectMeNow – Version 1.6 available …
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ConnectMeNow, a small application for Mac OS X to quickly mount network shares, has been updated to version 1.6.

In this version I have added the requirement to enter an admin password to reveal passwords.
This way the tool can be used on machines used by users who should not see the actual password in a safe manner.

Additionally, even though the implementation of SSH isn’t the best, I’ve increased the time-out for waiting for login information request by the server. Initially this was 1 second and has now been increased to 2 seconds. The 1 second wait worked just fine, however, slower servers, like a server outside of your home or business network, might take too long to respond. In those cases a higher time-out value proved easier to work with.

With the help of Whistle Master, I’ve been able to add WebDAV support as well.

A minor bug when entering the server alias name has been resolved as well.

And finally, you might have noticed it already, I’ve changed the App icon.

For  download of the latest version, please read the original article (Quickly connect Network shares on a Mac with ConnectMeNow), where you can also ask questions or report issues. Or … find the application on our Downloads Page.

Arduino Programming for Beginners – Part 9: Text Input

Arduino Programming for Beginners – Part 9: Text Input
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We have learnt quite a bit in the past 8 chapters. In this ninth chapter we will start we will combine some of the things we’ve talked about and with that show you how we can read something from the Serial Monitor of the Arduino IDE, so a user can enter text or numbers.

This is the ninth part of a series of articles I’ve written to get beginners started with Arduino Programming in the programming language C, which I’ve written with the intend to teach my 13 year old nephew (Bram) to get started with the Arduino. After all, he wants to build a robot, but without some basic knowledge about programming, he won’t get far ….

Besides an introduction into the language C, the default language used for Arduino Programming, “Arduino Programming for Beginners” will also touch topics like how to setup an Arduino, get a developers environment running, and look at a few basic electronic parts which we connect to our Arduino.

Arduino Programming for Beginners – Part 8: Arrays

Arduino Programming for Beginners – Part 8: Arrays
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In this eight “chapter” of our articles on how to do Arduino Programming for beginners, we will take a look at arrays – what they are and how we can work with them.

This is the eight part of a series of articles I’ve written to get beginners started with Arduino Programming in the programming language C, which I’ve written with the intend to teach my 13 year old nephew (Bram) to get started with the Arduino. After all, he wants to build a robot, but without some basic knowledge about programming, he won’t get far ….

Besides an introduction into the language C, the default language used for Arduino Programming, “Arduino Programming for Beginners” will also touch topics like how to setup an Arduino, get a developers environment running, and look at a few basic electronic parts which we connect to our Arduino.

Arduino Programming for Beginners – Part 7: Strings

Arduino Programming for Beginners – Part 7: Strings
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In this seventh installment of our articles on how to do Arduino Programming for beginners, we will take a look at working with text, or “strings”. So far we have worked with numbers and booleans, and touched on strings even though you might not have noticed it. In this article we will dig into strings, how they work and what we can do with them.

This is the seventh part of a series of articles I’ve written to get beginners started with Arduino Programming in the programming language C, which I’ve written with the intend to teach my 13 year old nephew (Bram) to get started with the Arduino. After all, he wants to build a robot, but without some basic knowledge about programming, he won’t get far ….

Besides an introduction into the language C, the default language used for Arduino Programming, “Arduino Programming for Beginners” will also touch topics like how to setup an Arduino, get a developers environment running, and look at a few basic electronic parts which we connect to our Arduino.

Arduino Programming for Beginners – Part 6: Functions

Arduino Programming for Beginners – Part 6: Functions
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In this article we will talk about Functions. In previous parts we have worked with two functions already (setup and loop), but in this part we will go deeper into using functions and creating our own.

This is the sixth part of a series of articles I’ve written to get beginners started with Arduino Programming in the programming language C, which I’ve written with the intend to teach my 13 year old nephew (Bram) to get started with the Arduino. After all, he wants to build a robot, but without some basic knowledge about programming, he won’t get far ….

Besides an introduction into the language C, the default language used for Arduino Programming, “Arduino Programming for Beginners” will also touch topics like how to setup an Arduino, get a developers environment running, and look at a few basic electronic parts which we connect to our Arduino.

Arduino Programming for Beginners – Part 0: Overview

Arduino Programming for Beginners – Part 0: Overview
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This article just presents the entire content overview of the mini course “Arduino Programming for Beginners” which I wrote for my nephews Bram and Max.

Originally I had placed the full overview with each chapter, but since that list became rather long, I decided to only show an overview of a given chapter with that give chapter.

So on this page an overview of all chapters and paragraphs of the “course”.

Arduino Programming for Beginners – Part 5: Going in Loops

Arduino Programming for Beginners – Part 5: Going in Loops
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In this article we will talk about loops. Loops are used for going through programming instructions for a defined or undefined number of times, so that we do not have to write the same statement over and over again. We will look at “for”-loops, “while”-loops and “do … while …”-loops.

This is the fifth part of a series of articles I’ve written to get beginners started with Arduino Programming in the programming language C, which I’ve written with the intend to teach my 13 year old nephew (Bram) to get started with the Arduino. After all, he wants to build a robot, but without some basic knowledge about programming, he won’t get far ….

Besides an introduction into the language C, the default language used for Arduino Programming, “Arduino Programming for Beginners” will also touch topics like how to setup an Arduino, get a developers environment running, and look at a few basic electronic parts which we connect to our Arduino.

Arduino Programming for Beginners – Part 4: Decisions

Arduino Programming for Beginners – Part 4: Decisions
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In this article we will talk about making decisions (if … then … or switch … case …). Decisions are very important in our program to react to changing data or events, or to go through a list (loop) of data or events. We call that Control Flow – meaning code is being executed in a different order based on conditions.

This is the fourth part of a series of articles I’ve written to get beginners started with Arduino Programming in the programming language C, which I’ve written with the intend to teach my 13 year old nephew (Bram) to get started with the Arduino. After all, he wants to build a robot, but without some basic knowledge about programming, he won’t get far ….

Besides an introduction into the language C, the default language used for Arduino Programming, “Arduino Programming for Beginners” will also touch topics like how to setup an Arduino, get a developers environment running, and look at a few basic electronic parts which we connect to our Arduino.

Arduino Programming for Beginners – Part 3: Working with Data

Arduino Programming for Beginners – Part 3: Working with Data
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In this article we will talk about “data”, after all, a computer can do pretty much only one thing: handle data in a way we dictate. For this we need what is called “data types”, “variables” and “constants”.

This is the third part of a series of articles I’ve written to get beginners started with Arduino Programming in the programming language C, which I’ve written with the intend to teach my 13 year old nephew (Bram) to get started with the Arduino. After all, he wants to build a robot, but without some basic knowledge about programming, he won’t get far ….

Besides an introduction into the language C, the default language used for Arduino Programming, “Arduino Programming for Beginners” will also touch topics like how to setup an Arduino, get a developers environment running, and look at a few basic electronic parts which we connect to our Arduino.

Arduino Programming for Beginners – Part 2: Output

Arduino Programming for Beginners – Part 2: Output
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In this article we will go a little deeper into Arduino Programming, by exploring the developer tools, also knows as the Arduino IDE and how we can output information of the Arduino to our computer.

This is the second part of a series of articles I’ve written to get beginners started with Arduino Programming in the programming language C, which I’ve written with the intend to teach my 13 year old nephew (Bram) to get started with the Arduino. After all, he wants to build a robot, but without some basic knowledge about programming, he won’t get far ….

Besides an introduction into the language C, the default language used for Arduino Programming, “Arduino Programming for Beginners” will also touch topics like how to setup an Arduino, get a developers environment running, and look at a few basic electronic parts which we connect to our Arduino.

Arduino Programming for Beginners – Part 1: Setup

Arduino Programming for Beginners – Part 1: Setup
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This is the first part of a series of articles I’ve written to get beginners started with Arduino Programming in the programming language C, which I’ve written with the intend to teach my 13 year old nephew Bram Knuit (and his 10 year old brother Max Knuit) to get started with the Arduino. After all, he wants to build a robot, but without some basic knowledge about programming, he won’t get very far ….

In this article we will show you how to get started with our little Arduino Programming course, by selecting an Arduino and setup the developer tools so we can actually try some of the examples that will be discussing in the next chapters.

Besides an introduction into the language C, the default language used for Arduino Programming, “Arduino Programming for Beginners” will also touch topics like how to setup an Arduino, get a developers environment running, and look at a few basic electronic parts which we connect to our Arduino. The lack of basic knowledge should hopefully not be a problem … so I’ll be trying to keep everyone in mind.

WordPress – Preserve Backslash in Posts

WordPress – Preserve Backslash in Posts
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Preserve backslashes in WordPress brings us to one of the annoying features of WordPress: it strips backslashes.
It has it’s place an reason of course, but it can be a PITA when you’re trying to post code examples.

In this very short article, I’ll show you how to preserve your backslashes with a very small function which replaces each backslash with an HTML entity, which should make it safe to work with in your database and not loose the backslash. Even my code highlighter does not seem to be bothered by it and displays the code correctly (ie. not showing the HTML entity, but rather show the desired backslash).

Note that manually entering the HTML entity in the HTML code of your article (Text view) works only once! When loaded again in the tinyMCE editor, the HTML entity will be converted to a backslash again and posting an update would remove that backslash again. This function prevents the loss of the backslash by doing it’s work each time you save your work.

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